OVER FIFTEEN YEARS EXPERIENCE IN ROPES AND FENDERS

PRODUCTS / PRICES


 

ROPES & TWINES

RopesThere are so many different ropes and twines and applications that it is impossible to list or stock them all, we will however attempt to fulfil your needs and match samples that are sent to us if at all possible. This website shows only a very small selection of what is available. Please contact us to discuss your needs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 ROPE USES AND CHARACTERISTICS

Natural Fibres

Manila (Musa Textilis)
A natural fibre rope made from the leaves of a tree form the Philippines which is a member of the banana family. It is a good, hardwearing all round rope ideal for use outside due to its natural oil, particularly good for fenders and decking ropes.

Sisal (Agave Sisalana)
The cheaper of the natural fibre ropes, made from a grass like plant, a relative of the cactus plant. Untreated it will rot more quickly than manila. A treated, “rot proof” version is available on request.  Beware of cheap “tow” waste sisal as it degrades very quickly!

Coir (Cocos Nucifera)
Fibres obtained from the outside husk of the coconut and made into rope is known as coir. Coir is a very durable, light weight rope with great elasticity and has natural waterproof qualities. Coir therefore, makes excellent outdoor mats and rubbing strakes.

Cotton (Gossypium)
A smooth white rope made from a shrub which grows in warm, humid climates. It was once used to make towing ropes for horse drawn boats, possibly because of its elasticity, allowing the horse to take up the strain without snatching the rope. Broken pieces of cotton were never thrown away when used on the narrowboats. These pieces would have been used for the decorative ropework seen on the “butty” such as turk’s heads, swan’s necks and cabin strings.

Hemp (Cannabis Sativa)
This is the strongest of the natural fibres, it makes a smooth rope which is nice to handle and work with. It is hard wearing and does not become hard when wet. When tarred it was used as the first choice for the rigging of sailing ships. Hemp is still available today but it is very expensive and needs to be rot- proofed if it is to be used in all weathers.

 

Synthetic fibres

Nylon
This is a strong manmade fibre with good wearing properties and resistance to UV light(sunlight). It sinks and tends to get hard when wet which can make handling difficult. It makes good permanent mooring lines. Splicing this rope can be difficult for the inexperienced.

Polyester
Heavier than nylon but not as strong, it has good resistance to wear and UV light. It is flexible and makes a good choice for mooring lines. However, like nylon it is difficult to splice.

Polypropylene (split film)
Extruded as a film and twisted into a rope, a popular choice for tarpaulins, haulage and general purpose. It has little resistance to abrasion or UV light.

Polypropylene (Monofilament)
This yarn is made from a continuous, single filament. Monofilament polypropylene rope is one of the most popular, durable, multipurpose ropes. However it has little resistance to sunlight and has a medium wear resistance, it can also become rough to handle after wear.

Polypropylene (multifilament)
The construction of this rope is similar to that of synthetic hemp, the yarns being  fibrillated which gives it an appearance similar to that of polyester but with all the characteristics of synthetic hemp.

Polypropylene (staple spun)
This rope is made from staple spun fibres and resembles sisal. It has good grip and wearing properties. It can have an ultraviolet inhibitor included in the manufacturing process. (“Get Knotted” only purchases staple spun polypropylene rope with the UV inhibitor). This type of rope makes a good mooring line as it floats!

Polypropylene (synthetic hemp)
This rope is made from highly fibrillated polypropylene fibres to ensure excellent flexibility. It is made to simulate natural hemp. It is smooth, lightweight, flexible, hard-wearing and it floats, making it the best choice for mooring lines and popular with the traditional enthusiast. All of our standard mooring lines are made from synthetic hemp (other ropes can be used if requested).

Please note: All weights and dimensions are approximate.
Click images to view larger size.
    Size Weight Unit Price (£)
Cotton Rope
Cotton Rope (Yarn constructed)
6mm
NA
£0.75/m
Cotton Rope
Cotton Rope (Yarn constructed)
8mm
NA
£1.00/m
Cotton Rope
Cotton Rope (Yarn constructed)
10mm
NA
£1.50/m
Cotton Rope
Cotton Rope (Yarn constructed)
12mm
NA
£2.00/m
Coil
Grade 1 Manila
6mm
NA
£0.30/m
Coil
Grade 1 Manila
8mm
NA
£0.40/m
Coil
Grade 1 Manila
10mm
NA
£0.45/m
Coil
Grade 1 Manila
12mm
NA
£0.50/m
Coil
Grade 1 Manila
14mm
NA
£0.70/m
Coil
Grade 1 Manila
16mm
NA
£1.00/m
Coil
Grade 1 Manila
18mm
NA
£1.40/m
Coil
Grade 1 Manila
20mm
NA
£2.20/m
Coil
Grade 1 Manila
24mm
NA
£2.50/m
Coil
Grade 1 Manila
28mm
NA
£3.50/m
Coir
Coir
12mm
NA
£0.60/m
Coir
Coir
16mm
NA
£0.90/m
Coir
Coir
24mm
NA
£2.20/m
Coir
Coir
32mm
NA
£3.65/m
Coir
Coir
48mm
NA
£7.35/m
Coir
Coir
64mm
NA
£12.70/m
Coir
Coir
72mm
NA
£15.60/m
Coir
Coir
96mm
NA
£19.70/m
Per coil prices
Any
Various
POA